Peer mentors help students at different points in their University journey. Mentors know what it is like to be a student at the University of Bath and share their own experiences and offer guidance and support.

Become a Peer Mentor

Becoming a Peer Mentor can have a huge impact on your mentees, helping them settle into life and study at Bath, prepare to go on placement, start exercising regularly and more. You can be a Mentor regardless of what you’re studying and become a valuable source of support for fellow students.

As a Peer Mentor you’ll receive general training and there will always be someone available to help and support you.

Find out more about becoming a Peer Mentor

Mentoring for new Undergraduate students

All first year students at the University are allocated a peer mentor. They are there to be a friendly face on campus, someone who can help you settle in and support you during your first year. They are based in your department and supported by a small group of lead peer mentors and a departmental member of staff.

You will meet your mentor at a welcome event, organised by your mentors and your department. You can talk to them about a wide range of things, including:

  • What to bring to University,
  • Useful tips on the course,
  • How to study effectively,
  • How to get involved in University life,
  • Where to go and explore in Bath,
  • How to find additional support.

Find out more about becoming a peer mentor

Mentoring for new Doctoral students

A doctoral peer mentor is a doctoral student who has knowledge and experience of starting doctoral studies at Bath. A doctoral peer mentor will support you with the step up to doctoral studies, help you settle into life at Bath and be a point of contact throughout your first year.

You can talk to your mentor about a wide range of things, including:

  • Life and work at the University of Bath,
  • Adapting to studying at a doctoral level,
  • The tough times,
  • Opportunities available to doctoral students,
  • Preparing for approval of candidature and confirmation,
  • How to find additional support.

We currently work with the Doctoral College to run mentoring schemes in most departments across the University. Some departments run their own mentoring schemes - speak to your supervisor, personal tutor or director of studies to see if there is a mentoring scheme available in your department.

Read more on the Doctoral College website

Find out more about becoming a doctoral peer mentor

No mentoring scheme?

The Peer Support Team and the Doctoral College are currently looking at increasing the provision for peer mentoring for more doctoral students. If you are a postgraduate student and would like to see a mentoring scheme in your department or faculty, there are lots of things you can do.

Find out more about starting a new mentoring scheme

Mentoring for Placement students

A Placement Mentor is a student who has recently started or completed their placement, supporting students through the placement process. You can talk to your mentor about a wide variety of topics, including:

  • How to find placement opportunities
  • Applying for placements
  • Preparing for interviews and assessment centres
  • Getting ready to go on placement
  • What support will be available when you are on placement

The scheme is opt-in and you can choose a mentor via our networking events. If you are unsure who you want as a mentor, you can also request a random mentor from your department.

Evelien's Story

Placement Networking Events

Networking events are a great opportunity for you to meet Placement Peer Mentors from your department and find out more about their experiences applying for and being on placement. You can also find a potential mentor at these events. They will take place across October and November.

Other Mentoring Schemes

There are other mentoring schemes taking place across campus.

  • Together with the Department of Social and Policy Sciences to run a bespoke scheme for Social Work students while they are on placement. Final year students plan and facilitate regular mentoring sessions to help second year students who are on their first placements.
  • The Disability Service run a campus buddy scheme for new students with Asperger syndrome, an Autism Spectrum Condition, Social Anxiety or Social Phobia. Find out more about the campus buddies scheme and how to become a campus buddy on their website

Informal mentoring and buddy schemes also exist in departments we do not currently work with. Speak to your personal tutor or supervisor to see if your department offers a mentoring scheme.

If there is a new scheme you would like to set up, we can also provide support and advice in starting up new schemes. Contact us if there is a scheme you’d like to set up.