Becoming a Peer Mentor can have a huge impact on your mentees, helping them settle into life and study at Bath, prepare to go on placement, start exercising regularly and more. Mentors come from all departments and levels of study at the University and are a valuable source of support for fellow students.

Peer mentors receive general training on a range of issues with which they could be faced and there will always be someone available to help and support the mentors.

COVID-19 Update to Services

Peer Mentors will be expected to meet with their mentees online and events and activities will take place online for the foreseeable future. Activities will return to campus when it is safe to do so. Mentors will receive guidance or training on how to complete their role online during the year.

Undergraduate Peer Mentors

What does being a Peer Mentor involve?

Peer Mentors support new students in their department as they start their course. You can share your experience of the first year to answer questions and signpost appropriate support services to help students find the support they need. Mentors should maintain contact with their mentees throughout the year and departments also hold events where mentors can meet their mentees.

Read the role description

Why should I become a Peer Mentor?

Being a Peer Mentor is a great way to support new students and develop yourself. As a Peer Mentor, you can…

  • develop valuable skills that employers look for, including communication and listening skills, organisation and networking.
  • increase your confidence by helping others.
  • build a sense of community in your department by breaking down the barriers between year groups.
  • …learn more about the support available in the University.
  • …be invited to our annual celebration event.
Rhys' story Nefeli's story

How do I become a Peer Mentor?

Almost anyone can volunteer to be a peer mentor but generally peer mentors are second year students. However, if you are not in your second year and would like to volunteer don't let this stop you!

In order to become a Peer Mentor, you need to sign up to and attend one of our training sessions in Semester 2 which covers the skills and information you will need to complete the role. If you are unable to attend the subject specific session email peersupport@bath.ac.uk who can recommend alternatives.

Before signing up, we recommend that you read the role description so you understand what is expected of a peer mentor.

Sign up to become a peer mentor in your department

After you have completed your training, you will be able to apply to become a Lead Peer Mentor.

Lead Peer Mentors

What does being a Lead Peer Mentor involve?

Lead Peer Mentors take on additional responsibilities alongside their role as a peer mentor. You can organise and lead Welcome Events and other activities during the year for new students to meet their mentors, as well as supporting, motivating and representing for your fellow mentors.

Read the role description

Why should I become a Lead Peer Mentor?

Being a Lead Peer Mentor is a great way to support your fellow mentors and develop yourself. As a Lead Peer Mentor, you can…

  • develop valuable skills that employers look for, including leadership, communication skills, organisation and networking.
  • …get experience planning events and supporting, motivating and leading a team.
  • …demonstrate you are willing to take on additional responsibilities.
  • build a sense of community in your department by breaking down the barriers between year groups.
  • …be invited to our annual celebration event.
Vishnupriya's story Nele's story

How do I become a Lead Peer Mentor?

Once you have completed training to become a Peer Mentor, you will be invited to apply for the role of Lead Peer Mentor. We recommend reading the role description and outlining the skills and experiences you have that are relevant to the role.

Applications close on 27th April at 10am. Successful applicants will be invited to Lead Peer Mentor training, which will be taking place online in May. 

Apply to become a Lead Peer Mentor

 

Doctoral Peer Mentors

What does being a Peer Mentor involve?

Doctoral Peer Mentors support new doctoral students as they start their course, providing support during the first few months of their PhD. Peer Mentors can share their experience as a new PhD student and answer questions about the transition to doctoral study, life and work at the University of Bath. Where possible, mentors support students in their own department. 

Read the Doctoral Peer Mentor role description

Why should I become a Peer Mentor?

Being a Peer Mentor is a great way to support new students and develop yourself. As a Peer Mentor, you can…

  • …develop valuable skills that employers look for, including communication and listening skills, organisation and networking.
  • ...develop your influencing and engagement skills – a core component of the Researcher Development Framework (RDF)
  • …build a doctoral student community.
  • …learn more about the support available in the University.
  • …increase your confidence by helping others.
  • …be invited to our annual celebration event.

Chao's story

How do I become a Peer Mentor?

Doctoral students can become a mentor after the first six months of their PhD. It is recommended that new mentors should not be in the last 6 months of their course when they sign up, as they probably will complete their studies before they are allocated mentees.

Sign up now


The SU and the Doctoral College work closely with students in the following departments to run mentoring schemes. 

  • Architecture and Civil Engineering
  • Biology and Biochemistry
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Health
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Politics, Languages and International Studies
  • Psychology
  • Social and Policy Sciences

Some mentoring schemes operate in other departments. Therefore, if your department is not on the list, we recommend speaking with your supervisor or director of studies if you are interested in volunteering as a mentor.  If your department doesn't have a mentoring scheme and you think that one would be valuable , there are several things that you can do to set up a new mentoring scheme.

Find out more about starting a new mentoring scheme

PGT Peer Mentors

The Role

PGT Peer Mentors support new PGT students from their faculty, providing support during the first few months of their course. Peer Mentors can share their experience as a new PGT student and answer questions about the transition to doctoral study and life and work at the University of Bath.

Peter's story

Read the MRes Peer Mentor role description

Recruitment and Training - Mentors for MRes Students

We recruit Postgraduate Peer Mentors for doctoral students over the summer. In order to take on this role, you need to be a current or former MRes student in the Faculty of HSS and expect to be a doctoral student from September 2019.

Sign up to become a mentor for MRes students

If you think that a mentoring scheme would be valuable in your department, there are several things that you can do to set up a new mentoring scheme.

Find out more about starting a new mentoring scheme

Placement Peer Mentors

The Role

Placement Peer Mentors support students going through the placement process. They support a small group of mentees preparing for placement or while they are on placement. Mentors also attend a networking event for their department, where they can share their placement experiences with students. You could support students with finding and applying for placements, preparing to go on placement and accessing support while they’re on placement.

Mentors do not support with the writing of applications or replicate any of the support that already exists. They act as informal peer to peer support and are trained to signpost students where necessary.

We currently work with the Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences and Science to run mentoring schemes.

Read the role description

Jasmin's story Laura's story

Recruitment and Training

We recruit mentors over the summer, who are students returning from placement. Students who apply will need to complete an online training session to prepare for the role.

Become a Placement Peer Mentor

Social Work Placement Peer Mentors

Final year students in Social Work can also volunteer as a Placement Peer Mentor to support second year students while on their first placements. Peer Mentors plan and facilitate regular mentoring sessions during the first semester, delivering activities and supporting group work to enable students to share their experiences on placement, discuss assessment work and find support on issues.

In order to become a Social Work Placement Peer Mentor, you just need to sign up to and attend our training session on 1st October. We recommend that you also familiarise yourself with the role description, which outlines in more detail the responsibilities of the role. If you are interested in becoming a Peer Mentor but are unable to attend the training session, email peersupport@bath.ac.uk.

Read the role description

Sign up to our training session

Exercise Peer Mentors

Are you passionate about exercise, a keen gym-goer or enjoy a leisurely walk on your lunch break? We're looking for enthusiastic and motivated students to get involved in the Exercise Peer Mentor Scheme.

As an Exercise Peer Mentor, you will be paired up with a student who is starting to exercise regularly to improve their mental health. You will help them to find activities they want to try, go with them to activities, help keep them motivated and engaged and keep going with their activities after you finish your role. 

Read the Role Description

Recruitment and Training

Recruitment for the role takes place at the beginning of the academic year. Successful candidates will be invited to a short training session to prepare them for the role of a peer mentor. There will be two training sessions, a mentoring session focusing on your role as a mentor, and a wellbeing training session. 

Apply Now

Benefits

There are lots of benefits for you whilst volunteering as a peer mentor. These include:

  • Develops important transferable skills.
  • Helping others increases your own confidence.
  • Will help consolidate your own knowledge and understanding of your programme or placement and the University.
  • Good opportunity to meet new people, building strong personal and professional networks
  • It will look good on your CV. It will provide evidence that you are willing to take on responsibility.
  • Being a mentor counts towards the Doctoral Skills Programme for postgraduate students.
  • Access to the Student Leaders Hub in the Virgil Building to carry out your work.
  • You will receive training on listening and communication skills.
  • You will be invited to an end of year thank you celebration event.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much time do I have to dedicate to peer mentoring?

The mentor/mentee relationship will last for the whole academic year. We expect mentors to meet their mentees at least once more during their first semester. From there, you and your mentees can decide how to continue the mentor/mentee relationship. You may want to continue meeting regularly, stay in touch via email or social media, or a mixture of these.

Is it paid?

Peer mentoring is voluntary. However, there are plenty of other benefits of being a peer mentor, including the opportunity to develop valuable skills that employers look for.

How many mentees will I have?

We try to allocate mentors approximately 5 students to mentor. This does depend on how many mentors sign up and the number of first years starting the course each year.

Will my mentees be from my course?

Yes, or a similar one. Our mentor schemes are arranged so you mentor students who are studying a similar course so you can share your experience.

When will I know who my mentees are?

This varies across mentor schemes, however most mentors know before their mentees arrive on campus. We recommend that mentors email their mentees before coming to University where possible. Placement mentees choose their mentors and you will be contact during the year if someone wants you to be their mentor.

When will my first meeting be and how do I arrange it?

For undergraduate mentors, your first meeting is arranged for you. Each department organises a welcome event at the start of the year, which mentors are expected to attend and meet their mentees. This is a good opportunity to introduce yourself and find out about your mentees.

For other schemes, you may be invited to a similar event during induction to meet your mentees. You can also invite mentees to meet you during your initial communications.

What happens next?

Arrange to meet up with your mentees throughout the year and support them through email or social media, whatever works for you and your mentees.

Where should we meet?

Most people meet up in a café on campus or somewhere in the department. Make sure you meet in a public place at first until you get to know your mentees.

How many times will we meet?

It’s up to you. It’s good to have meetings with your mentees in a group if you can arrange it, or even to meet up with another mentor and their mentees. That way, the new students get more opportunities to meet others on their course.

Am I expected to become a real friend for my mentees?

No. The mentor-mentee relationship is a semi-professional one. You might not get on that well on a personal basis but can still maintain the mentoring role. However, many mentor-mentee pairings have led to firm enduring friendships being made.

Still got questions? Get in touch!